FAQ

Cabinetry Care

Easy Top Cabinets are constructed of quality materials and finished with superior coatings. They have undergone rigorous testing prior to shipping. This is your assurance that Easy Top Cabinets will maintain their attractive finish and structural soundness throughout years of normal everyday use.
As with any product constructed of wood, a few moments of care and a little common sense can go a long way in keeping your new cabinets looking their best. Here are a few simple suggestions to make your cabinet care easier.

1. Suggestions

As with any product constructed of wood, a few moments of care and a little common sense can go a long way in keeping your new cabinets looking their best. Here are a few simple suggestions to make your cabinet care easier.
1). Clean cabinets as needed with a mild detergent or with soap and water (use sparingly) and dry well using a lint-free cloth for both washing and drying.
2). Wipe up spills, splatters and water spots as they occur, keeping cabinets and countertop surfaces dry.
3). Excess moisture can damage any cabinet finish. Give special attention to areas near the sink, range, dishwasher, oven and baseboards are most susceptible. Keep these surfaces dry.
4). Use cleaners and polishes designed for wood cabinets and clean all surfaces as needed.
5). Do not use abrasive cleaners, scouring pads or powdered cleaners. These materials may penetrate the cabinet finish allowing moisture to enter and cause deterioration.
6). Do not use aerosol sprays containing silicones or paste waxes.
7). Avoid draping damp cloths or dish towels over cabinet doors. Over time, this moisture could cause permanent water damages.
8). Avoid using cleansers that contain bleach, ammonia, or abrasives. These cleaners can damage your cabinet’s finish.
9). Do not use a dish cloth for cleaning. It could contain remnants of grease or detergents.
10). Do not allow oven cleaners or other caustic cleaners to touch the cabinets.
11). Follow instructions carefully for self-cleaning ovens and other kitchen appliances around cabinets.
12). Waxing is not necessary, but you may apply any furniture polish or lemon oil recommended for fine furniture, if desired. Be sure to wipe off excess to avoid build-up.

2. Remedies For Common Kitchen Accidents

Most problems can be prevented by wiping up any spills as soon as they occur. When removing a spot, begin at the outer edge and work toward the middle to prevent the spot from spreading.

1). Food Spots/Water Spots
Clean cabinets as needed with a mild detergent or with soap and water (use sparingly) and dry well using a lint-free cloth for both washing and drying. Use cleaners and polishes designed for wood cabinets and clean all surfaces as needed.

2). Greasy Spots
Rub grease, lipstick, crayon or oil with a damp cloth. Use cleaners and polishes designed for wood cabinets and clean all surfaces as needed.

3). Chewing Gum/Candle Wax
Apply a plastic bag filled with ice on top of the deposit until it is brittle enough to crumble off. Use cleaners and polishes designed for wood cabinets and clean all surfaces as needed.

4). Nicks/Dents
Most nicks and dents can be repaired with Putty Stick.

5). Scratches/Cigarette Burns
Most common scratches or burns can be repaired with an Cabinetry Care Kit. Rub the area with fine sandpaper until you have removed the scratch or burn. Re-stain with Cabinets color matched Touch-up Stain and apply a light coat of Cabinets Clear Sealer Finish. Use cleaners and polishes designed for wood cabinets and clean all surfaces as needed.

3. Basic kitchen cabinet maintenance

Moisture, dusts, and crawling creatures can penetrate your cabinets any time if the drawers and doors are not closed properly. Ensure that all the doors and drawers are fully closed to maintain what’s inside. Doors or drawers that do not close fully should be repaired.

Granite Counter Top Care

Tips

  1. As a rule, a granite sealer should be applied to all natural stones.
  2. Do: Blot up spills immediately.
    Acidic substances like wine, coffee, fruit juices, tomato sauce and sodas can etch the polish or stain the surface. Cooking oils may also leave a stain if not wiped up.
  3. Do: Clean surfaces using a sponge or soft cloth.
    Preferably use a specially formulated stone cleaner, but warm water and a basic liquid dish soap will do for quick clean-ups. However, repeated or excessive use of soap will cause build-up and dull your countertop’s shine.
  4. Do: Use coasters under all glasses, bottles and cans.
    Many common foods and drinks contain acids that may etch the polish or damage the surface. So for easy solid surface, natural stone and granite counter top maintenance, always use coasters no matter what the surface.
  5. For glasses and dishes that pile up on the kitchen countertop (which should be granite) and around the kitchen sink, just be sure to rinse out with water before letting them set for any length of time.
  6. Do: Use trivets and hot pads under pots, pans and dinnerware.
    Yes, you can take a hot pot off the stove and put it right on granite without any problems. But you must consider other issues as well.
  7. Grit that gets trapped between the pot and the countertop surface may scratch the surface–even granite. Granite is very hard and can take tons of abuse without any damage, but it does contain some softer minerals that could be chipped or scratched. The likelihood is pretty slim, but it is possible. And ALL other surfaces are softer that granite. Better safe than sorry.
  8. If it does happen, don’t fret too much. Most chips and scratches can be easily repaired, but it’s best to avoid them by following the granite counter top care tips.
  9. Also, once you remove the hot pan from the countertop the surface will be very hot and may burn.
  10. Do: Use cutting boards.
    Again, avoid the possibility of scratching the surface and protect your knives. Cutting on stone will dull and damage your knives’ edges quickly.
  11. Do: Dust mop your natural stone floors regularly.
    Use a clean, dry, non-treated dust-mop. Some people choose to use a vacuum cleaner. But be real careful. Worn parts or grit jammed by the wheels may scratch the surface.
  12. Do: Use door mats inside and out along with runners and area rugs.
    Grit, dirt and sand carried in by our shoes are abrasive and will wear and scratch the surface.
  13. Don’t: Use generic cleaning products such as bleach, glass cleaners or degreasers.
    These products that you buy at your local store contain acids, alkalis and other chemicals that can etch or damage the countertop surface or degrade the granite sealer leaving the stone more vulnerable to staining.
  14. Don’t: Use vinegar, ammonia, lemon or orange as cleaners.
  15. Don’t: Use bathroom, tub & tile or grout cleaners.
    The powders and even the “soft” creams contain abrasives that will scratch and dull surfaces.
  16. Don’t: Sit or stand on your countertops.
  17. Don’t: Place toiletry products directly on your countertop surface.
    Hair products, perfumes, colognes, nail products, creams, lotions and potions may stain or damage the surface or etch the polish leaving a ring. Protect your countertop by placing these products on a decorative tray like they do in fancy hotels!
  18. Dishsoap is commonly recommended for stone and granite counter top care as a daily cleaner because it will not damage your stone or sealant if it’s a mild, plain soap like Ivory. But however, soap scum will build up over time, dulling the surface and requiring a thorough cleaning with special products to restore the original luster.

Advice

Daily: Truthfully, hot water and a sponge is sufficient to wipe up spills and debris and keep your countertops clean and tidy throughout the day. At the end of the day, a quick spray and wipe of the most heavily used areas with a stone cleaner will adequately clean, disinfect and protect your countertops.

Weekly: Use the stone cleaner over the entire surface.

Quarterly: Polishes, revitalizers and color-ehancers can also be used periodically for the ultimate in natural stone and granite counter top maintenance.

Yearly: Annual re-sealing is a good idea although the frequency for proper granite counter top maintenance really depends on the type of stone (porous or dense) and the quality of the sealant. It’s a very easy job and unless you have a stone that really shouldn’t be sealed (i.e. some black granites), then re-sealing every year will only ensure that your countertops are well protected against staining. It’s a must for marble, travertine and limestone.